FCC Moves to Boost Wi-Fi Speed

Must Read

OnePlus 8 cases to refresh ‘Sandstone’ w/ new cyan and purple color options

The OnePlus 8 series is just around the corner, and the leaks are ramping up ahead of its April...

Who Was Chuck Cooper? All You Need to Know About the First African American to Be Drafted in the NBA

Basketball may have been suspended at professional and collegiate level for over a month now, but despite the lack...

To Save Avon, New Owner Comes Calling on Social Media

The Avon lady has a new potential savior. After years of unsuccessful turnaround attempts at Avon Products Inc. by...

Adam Schiff Denounces Trump’s Firing of Inspector General: ‘Gutting the Independence of the Intelligence Community’

Representative Adam Schiff condemned Donald Trump's decision to fire the Inspector General of the Intelligence Community Michael Atkinson, warning...

Google Duo can now support twelve-person group video calls

As we all work together to practice safe social distancing, we’re finding and adapting ways to replace that personal...

WASHINGTON—Federal regulators are moving to make changes in the allocation of public airwaves to boost the speed of Wi-Fi networks, but at the possible expense of broadcasters, telecommunications firms and others who want the bandwidth for their business.

The Federal Communications Commission said Wednesday it will vote April 23 on allowing Wi-Fi devices to access a wider swath of airwaves than they currently use. If the agency approves the policy change as expected, consumers could start feeling the impact of the new superfast…

Join Wall Street Journal For Just $1
Credit: WSJ.com

------ Search with Google ------
- Advertisement -

Popular




The Biggest Challen of a Funeral Director during Handling COVID-19 Deaths

I consider funeral directors to be the end healthcare facilitators of people, the 'last responders' they call us sometimes. My wife and I, and...

With Medical Equipment in Short Supply, 3-D Printing Steps Up in Coronavirus Crisis

Nurses at St. Luke's University Health Network in Bethlehem, Pa., wear masks printed by Filament Innovations. Photo: St. Luke's University Health Network By Sara Castellanos and March 31,...




More Articles Like This